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Collection Advice; past-due recovery practices with the help of professionals Before collecting on your own, consult a professional. Collection advice.It’s always a best practice for a clinic to have policies and procedures for their accounts receivables. To make sure yours line up with current rules, laws, and regulations, it’s smart to consult with a professional for collection advice. Here are some basics:Phone calls Picking up the phone and calling the past-due patient early on can ferret out some smaller problems and misunderstandings that have simple solutions.  Still, it’s important your staff knows and understands federal and state laws governing debt collection calls. Dialing one patient too often or after a certain hour at night can land your practice in afoul of regulations. To help you tighten your telephone procedures, schedule a consultation with your accounts receivable partner to help you develop guidelines and a script, so your calls are both effective and stay within the law. Letters; Sending a letter can also open communication with patients who are behind on their bills. This is a chance to lay out their options, including contact information and business hours, and what the next steps are if payment does not arrive by the due date.Small-business owners: Build your accounts receivable plan  small business owners accounts receivable Collections. One of the challenges of being an entrepreneur is having to do it all yourself. For small business owners accounts receivable can be a bear. There are sales, marketing, HR, strategic planning, budgeting, accounting, inventory, shipping. In some ways, you know more than your larger counterparts!Adding to the challenge of mastering these many skills are the small things that crop up every so often. One of these is trying to recover money from a non-paying client or customer. In order to increase your cash flow, it’s important to build a proven accounts receivable system that grows with you. Build a payment schedule You already have a billing and collections policy. (And if you don’t, it’s time to build one.) If it’s not fully implemented and automated, now’s the time to get that system running. With the help of your billing software, create instant reminders when payments are late, and establish a schedule and procedures to follow up. Ideally, this should become an automated part of doing business. Adjust your policies Sometimes, all it takes are a few changes to boost your inflow. For example, when collecting client information, get their permission to call or text your cell phone and require a deposit before they get the service. If bills are going out in 30 days (or longer), it might be worth speeding up the cadence. Follow up. Within a few days of service, follow up with a phone call or email. Verify that the service was completed, ask if the customer has any questions or feedback, and finish the call by letting the customer know their final amount due, and when the invoices are going out. It’s not uncommon for unhappy and dissatisfied clients to ignore the bill or postpone payment. Early contact is one way to head this off. Give incentivesIn addition to having a late fee built into your policy, reward customers who pay early. For example, offer a 2 percent discount for payment received in 10 days. Give laser focus to overdue accounts. When the due date passes with no sign of green from the client, it’s time to follow up. (Hopefully with some of these proactive measures, this will happen much less often.) It is here where small business owners get shy out of fear of annoying the customer. In reality, waiting diminishes your chances of recovering the money. Be proactive, and step up your attempts to connect before the next billing cycle. Start with a courteous email. If nothing comes of that, be persistent. Increase contact frequency to at least once a week with phone calls, follow-up invoices, and emails.  Most customers and clients do the right thing and offer payment for the goods and services they’ve received. Unfortunately, there are always some who put you off or fail to pay altogether. If your accounts receivables are getting too high, perhaps it’s time for a hard look at your financial system, and even plan for collections work on your accounts. As we’ve seen in the medical sector, a surefire way to delay payments is to confuse and anger customers with a surprisingly high bill. We always say the customer is entitled to a solid forecast on what they’re in for before service begins. Be sure and factor in a range of variables that can alter the terms along the way, and always inform them how changes will affect their costs. Before services begin, collect a down payment.Make it easier for customers to make payments If the only available option is still the envelope and stamp, it’s really time to build more channels. Think about it: In a few years, you could be talking to young people who never used or needed a debit card, thanks to cardless ATMs. If your customers have to dig out their seldom-used checkbooks and go out and buy stamps in order to pay you, you’ll be waiting longer for your money. Talk to your bank or credit union about electronic payment options.Partner with a collection agency as a last resort Even if your customers are local, people move. If your agency isn’t licensed or bonded and insured in your customer’s new state, what you have is another barrier to recovering the money.4. How do you ensure employees adhere to federal and state laws? Most collection agencies will tell you in the marketing materials they adhere to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA). Ask more questions, such as which practices are in place to train and audit the employees to make sure they follow federal law. Don’t forget other regulations. A well-built collection agency has systems to adhere to industry-specific laws and rules from state to state.5. Is the company accredited? Not all states require accreditation, but membership in an organization such as ACA International is a good sign. To belong to ACA International, members must be bonded and take the pledge to follow the nonprofit’s code of conduct for debt collectors, along with state and federal laws. Agencies that don’t are subject to review by the ACA’s Ethics Committee.Before you commit to a collection partner, make sure you have a good grasp of their core values and practices so you know debt recovery will be done the right way on your behalf. Since 2004, we at CRI System have built our business to represent thousands of businesses across many industries in all 50 states.Need collection help? Call us  Pay Less Fees and Get More Recovered  Best Debt Collection Agency For Small Businesses unreturned merchandise, specialty services, maintenance, commercial, corporate, debts, delinquent invoices, outstanding invoices, and more. Never write off unpaid debts instead, collect owed B2B money. Best collection agency for the cheapest prices. No money out of pocket for collections services. Free collections services if I don’t get paid? Commercial Business Collections of past due debts and invoices. Debt Collections for businesses. Never write off unpaid debts instead, we will collect what is owed to you! B2B recovery of money to your company. Strictly contingency. Lowest rates. We only collect a low fee when we successfully collect funds owed to you. Bring outstanding DSO, invoices, Contracted work current. Did a contract not pay what they owe to you? Have our Expert team of corporate collection professionals work for you! No fee unless we collect your funds. Best prices and deals. Flexible and customized for your business needs. Looking for the fastest way to collect unpaid invoices, bill of lading, delinquent customers, clients, businesses pay you back fast. Overdue, Past due, delinquent, Invoices, bad/hot checks, B2B Consulting Recovery & Investigations, LLC in Texas offers accounts receivable management and collections to businesses in the US. If you are asking yourself; how do I get my money back from a company who refuses to pay me? Simple, contact us immediately for free collections consultation. Check our fee rates before spending too much! We specialize in various business specialty collections. We will work one account if that is all you have or many. Small balance collections. Large balance collections. Low volume collections. High volume accounts. We know your business. We are the best collections company to use. Free debt and debtor reviews. Need someone to evaluate your outstanding account? Call the best recovery team, with lowest expense, who can get your money back quick and hassle free. Speedy recovery, asset research, investigations. If you are asking yourself "How do I collect" anything due to me, contact us and we will examine your debts, DSO, receivables. un-returned merchandise. Broken contracts? Unpaid damages? Need your money back? Mechanics liens. Lien perfection. File a lawsuit against a company that owes you money cheap and effective. Top commercial collection agency. Private commercial collection agency. Specializing in B2B collections. Experienced and discounted rates. Only pay when your money is received. Don't wait any longer to collect your past due invoices. do not wait to have our office help you with mechanics liens, bond claims, retainage. no money down. free to retain . hire us for free and we will only get paid after you get paid. Get paid on outstanding owed invoices. We can start the collections process today with no money upfront. no charge unless we win your money back. How do Liens work? How do I file a mechanics lien? Ask us for free business debt collections advice. large, mid-size, and small business. Money owed to your company Strictly contingency, Lowest rates. Commercial Collections, past due debts, invoices. Debt recovery for businesses. Debt collections for companies; energy, power, contract work, contractors, equipment rental, environmental, vehicle, construction, services, transportation, freight, technologies, suppliers, supply, rentals, machinery, bill of lading, unpaid services, hot checks, bad checks, returned checks, products, repairs, mechanical, fleet services, technology, telecommunications, industrial, manufacturing, unreturned merchandise, specialty services, maintenance, commercial, corporate, debts, delinquent invoices, outstanding invoices, and more. Never write off unpaid debts instead, collect owed B2B money. Best collection agency for the cheapest prices. No money out of pocket for collections services. Free collections services if I don’t get paid?

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THOMAS'S STORY

This is a hard journey

Thomas Dun. Decorated Viet Nam Vet. Located in Houston, TX, Exhibited Bravery in the Face of Death with the majority of his squad killed in Action.  https://www.youcaring.com/OnlyHope
 Thomas an only child, parents passing away young, Tragedy struck Tom hard his Wife of 8 years and young child were killed by a reckless driver, racing his car leaving Thomas surviving alone. Unable to walk for over 7 months & severely wounded, it took 2 years to recover. By the time he was able, his savings was gone and no one to fall back on, the streets was the only option.  it was 6+ years since the accident and he still lives that as his last normal day.
Thomas is always cheerful, doesn't drink or do any drugs (I am 100% confident) his 4 years on the street sadly is enough, a recent flu has dropped his weight down to bones, he bruised from sleeping on the concrete, but he would never let you know how hard he has it, but he would give you the shirt off of his back. A selfless person.    
Tom is wants work but, not many employers are willing to consider him YET based on age and the fact he is clearly having a hard time!!
The Funds will be used to get Tom Back on his feet as though he had family help him out. We are wanting to get Thomas, 6 months to 1 year Rent Paid up, A reliable vehicle for work, presentable work clothes, washer & Dryer, the household basics to get started again. 
We've negotiated some help in getting sponsors to help out a little bit because they met Tom and its hard not to like Tom when you meet him. He deserves better. Please Bless extend a helping hand anyway you can. 
Thomas is God Fearing Man Bu the Way and Honest, he used to manage the money room at large retailers. 

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Origins Education

                                                                               Various Name Spellings:

                                                                          Chippewa, Ojibwa, Ojibway

In their earliest history they were often called Chippeway or Chipaway. Chippewa is the Anglicized version of Ojibway (also spelled Ojibwe and Ojibwa). The origins of the name Ojibwa are really not known. However, the word for before in Ojibwa is Chi-bwa or Ji-bwa. Ojibwa has nothing to do with moccasins. Later, an "o" was added and a "y" also. And an "n" was used also. Before, can represent "first and original" also.

So Chi-bwa is the correct name. However, the "o" can mean "the" so it can actually represent, The First and The Originals. Ojibwa probably means The Original, while Ojibway probably means The Originals. Then we have to include Bwan as well. We know the "n" in Bwan is the plural so Ojibwan may be correct as may be Chippewan (properly spelled Chipweyan). Exactly what the "o" and "y" represent is a mystery. The name Chippewa is more commonly used in the United States and the name Ojibway is more common in Canada

Major Bands: Algonquin; Amikwa who are also known as the Nez Perce (they are the Nez Perce of Idaho), Bungee; Chipewyan including the Dogrib; Gwich'in; Hare; Slave; Yellowknifes; and all other Dene People; Cree (the northern Ojibway's or Muskeego); Missisaugaa; Nakawe; Nipissing; Ottawa or Odawa; Pembina; and Saulteaux or Saulteau. All Great Lakes Algonquians are Chippewa including the Abenaki; Delaware including the Mahican; Munsee; and Naticoke; Illini; Kickapoo; Menominee; Miami; Potawatomi; Sac or Sauk (both are short for Saginaw); the Saginaw including the Swan Creek and Black River Chippewa's; Shawnee; and Stockbridge. Out west, the Arapaho; Blackfeet; Cheyenne; and Gros Ventre. Further west, the Apache; Navajo; Wappo; Wichita (William Clark claimed in 1805, the Wichita are Chippaways who lived along the Red River between Oklahoma and Texas); Wiyot; Yuki; and Yurok.

Other Bands: Fish, Loon, Marten, Crane, and the Bear are totems. All totem members lived in all Chippewa villages.

Little Shell Band of Chippewa

List of bands from the National Archives descriptive pamphlet: Bad River Chippewa, Bois Fort Chippewa, Cass Lake and Winnibigoshish Chippewa, Chippewa Chippewa, Fond du Lac Chippewa. Grand Portage Chippewa, Gull Lake Chippewa, Lac Courte Oreilles Chippewa, Lac du Flambeau Chippewa, Leech Lake Pillager Chippewa, Mille Lac Chippewa, Nett Lake Chippewa, Otter Tail Pillage, Pembina, Red Cliff Chippewa, Red Lake Chippewa, Rice Lake Chippewa, turtle Mountain, Vermillion Lake Chippewa, and White Earth Chippewa

Original Homelands: Great Lakes region Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, and Iowa; North Dakota, Montana, South Dakota, Kansas, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Texas, Wyoming, Idaho, Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, California, Oregon, Washington, Alaska, Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, Nunavut, Northwest Territories, Ontario, Saskatchewan, Quebec, and Yukon; Mexico including the States of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Sinaloa, and Sonora.

Linguistic: Algonquian including Athabascan or Dene. The 1832 Edinburgh Encyclopedia proves the Athabascan or Dene People, are Algonquian. Click the link below. Or visit googlebooks.com. Write The 1832 Edinburgh Encyclopedia in the search box. Another link below has a list of Algonquian speaking tribes. It's very helpful in learning about how spread the Algonquian language is.

Books

Algonquin Nations


See also: Chippewa-Cree

Tribal Headquarters
Great Lakes Inter-tribal Council Tribal
St. Croix Chippewa Community
24663 Angeline Avenue - Webster WI 54893
Phone: 715-349-2195 - Fax: 715-349-5768

Office of Indian Affairs
State Capitol Building 2nd Floor,Room 202
PO Box 200801
Helena, Montana 59620
(406) 444-3702 Fax: (406) 444-1350
email: [email protected]

Little Shell Tribe Of Chippewa Indians of Montana
P.O. Box 543
Black Eagle, MT 59414
Phone (406) 315-2400
Fax (406) 315-2401
email: [email protected]

Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians Tribal Government,
please feel free to call either Cory LaVallie, Administrative Assistant – 477-2603;
or Jolean Morin, Records Manager – 477-2602.
They will gladly answer your questions.

The Sault Tribe of Chippewa Indians
Communications Department
531 Ashmun St.
Sault Ste. Marie, MI 49783
Email: [email protected]
Phone: 800-793-0660
Mobile: 906-632-6398
For further links see Wikipedia's Salt Tribe of Chippewa Indians

Dakota Ojibway Tribal Council
The Dakota Ojibway Tribal Council (in Canada) consists of Nine Member First Nations.

History

The Chippewa or Ojibway Indians are one of the largest groups of American Indians in North America. There are nearly 150 different bands of Chippewa in the northern part of the United States and in southern Canada (especially in Ontario, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan)

The Chippewa were exposed to non-Indians in the early 1600's.The tribe established trade relations with the French. During the French and Indian War, they fought the English and French to protect their land and race.

Relationships with other tribes developed as inter tribal warfare brought them together with the Ottawa, Potawatomi, Sac, Meskwaki and Kickapoo to defeat the Illinois in 1769.

The Chippewa, Ottawas, and Potowatomi confederacy became know as the Three Fires.

The tribe fought the British Colonies during the Revolutionary War.

Land cessions began before 1815, and continued to the early 1900's. As land was ceded, many tribal members migrated north, south, and west.


Commencing in 1860, the tribe was removed to Indian Territory in Oklahoma. Relocation to northeastern Oklahoma continued up to the early 1900's. They (the Swan Creek and Black River Saginaw Chippewa's with some Munsee), were forced to join the Cherokee in northeastern Oklahoma where they lost their tribal identity. In 1882, they were assigned to Turtle Mountain Reservation in North Dakota, and later assigned to the Rocky Boy's reservation in Montana with the Cree tribe with whom they had united with in the 1890's. Later becoming known as the Chippewa-Cree.

The Chippewa's have lived in the western part of North America for an extremely long time. They had an early warning (the Seven Fires Prophecy) and prepared. Even before the whites invaded. Lewis and Clark knew the Chippewa's or Chippaways, were living in Texas long before 1805. William Clark wrote in his journals under Estimates for the Eastern Indians, that they lived in Texas. They are listed number 53. Click this Clark Journals link to read about it. Or google Lewis and Clark's journals.

The Chippewa today are of mixed blood, mostly Native, French and English. Many live on reservations in Canada and the United States (Michigan, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Montana and North Dakota).

WPA Interviews of Chippewa - Bad River Reservation at Viterbo College in LaCrosse , now at


Wisconsin Historical Society (State)


Brief Histories

Moons or Months of the Year



Chippewa-Cree

  • Mik-se-io-pi-sim- Bald Eagle Moon, January
  • Ki-se-pi-sim- Kindness Moon, February
  • Nis-ki-pi-sim- Goose Moon, March
  • An-ye-ki-pi-sim- Frog Moon, April
  • Sah-ke-pah-kwah-pi-sim- Leaf Budding Moon,May
  • Pas-ka-we-pi-sim- Hatching Moon, June
  • Pi-nahw-wiu-pi-sim- Molting Moon, July
  • O-pah-o-pi-sim- Flying Moon, August
  • Was-ta-po-kaw-pi-sim- Fading Moon, September
  • Kas-ka-te-no-pi-sim- Freezing Moon, October
  • I-ko-pew-pi-sim- Frosty Moon, November
  • Pa-we-cha-ke-na-sees-pi-sim- Bare Moon, December


Additional References

Frederick Webb Hodge, in his Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico, gave a more complete history of the Chippewa tribe, with estimations of the population of the tribe at various time periods. Additional details are given in John Swanton's The Indian Tribes of North America.

Ohio History Central article on the Chippewa Indians

Densmore, Frances and Smithsonian Institution. Chippewa Customs. FHL Film 1009057 item 1

Danziger, Edmund Jefferson. The Chippewas of Lake Superior. Norman, OK. University of OK. 1978. FHL Book 970.3 C444da

Blackbird, Andrew J. History of the Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of Michigan. Ypsilanti, MI 1887. FHL Book 970.1 B562h or FHL film 1011853 Item; or Ottawa Chippewa

Warren, William Whipple. History of the Ojibway Nation. FHL Book 970.3 Oj3ww



Brief Timeline
  • 1622: Encountered a Frenchman employed by Samuel de Champlain.

  • 1689-1763: Fought the English and French in the French and Indian War, to protect their land and race.

  • 1754-63: Fought the English and French in another French and Indian War.

  • 1763: Led by their leader Bwan-di-ac (Pontiac), they fought the English who protected the French Colony in Quebec.

  • 1769: Led the Ottawa, Potawatomi, Sac, Meskwaki and Kickapoo to defeat the Illinois tribe after the English hired an Illinois assassin to kill Pontiac.

  • 1770: Northern timbered areas of Minnesota were conquered and occupied by the Chippewa.

  • 1776-1783: Fought the British and their colonies during the Revolutionary War.

  • 1783-1795: Fought the English and their American Colonies for control of the Midwest. The war ended after the Chippewa's lost the Battle of Fallen Timbers in 1794.

  • 1795: On August 3, 1795, they signed the Greeneville Treaty which ended the long war against the United States. The Chippewa's ceded most of Ohio and a small part of Indiana. The Greeneville Treaty is suspicious because no Reservations were created.

  • 1806 A Fur Trading Post of the North West Co. was in operation at the east end of Red Lake.

  • 1807: Supposedly the November 17, 1807 Treaty was signed, in which much of southeastern Michigan and northern Ohio was ceded. This treaty may have happened after the War of 1812. Many Reservations were created but not honored by the United States.

  • 1811-1815: Fought the English and their American Colonies, to defend their land and race. After losing the conflict, the Chippewa's ceded more land.

  • 1819: On September 24, 1819, a treaty was signed which ceded much Chippewa land in Michigan. Through treaty agreements, 16 Chippewa Reservations were created in Michigan.

  • 1821: On August 29, 1821, a treaty was signed which ceded much Chippewa land in Michigan. Through treaty agreements, 6 Chippewa Reservations were created in extreme southwestern Michigan.

  • 1830: In opposition to the Indian Removal Act; many of the tribe moved north to Canada. Some remained in the U.S
  • .
  • 1832: Led Black Hawks War. It was either fought to stop the Chippewa's from leaving Illinois and Wisconsin, for Iowa, 
  • Kansas, and Missouri or to defend a large Chippewa Reservation in Illinois and Missouri. The Chippewa's lost the war and prepared for an exodus to the west and southwest. If a large Chippewa Reservation was in fact located in Illinois and Missouri, it was eradicated.

  • 1833: On September 26, 1833, a treaty set aside a 5 million acre Reservation for the Chippewa's who originally lived in southern Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Michigan. It was located in western Iowa, extreme southern Minnesota, and northwestern Missouri. In Iowa, it extended up to where Spirit Lake is located then into extreme southern Minnesota. The Chippewa's ceded much Chippewa land in southeastern Wisconsin and northern Illinois.

  • 1836: On March 28, 1836, a treaty was signed in which the Chippewa's ceded much Chippewa land in the western part of the Lower Peninsula of Michigan. Through treaty agreements, 3 Chippewa Reservations were created. Chippewa leaders protested the treaty and claimed they were coerced into signing the treaty. Many Chippewa's followed prophecy and migrated north up to Canada.

  • 1836: May 9, the Swan Creek and Black River Saginaw Chippewa's, sign a treaty which eventually led to the exodus of 1838-1839. A Reservation northwest of St. Anthony Falls (Minneapolis-St.Paul) in Minnesota, was created for these Chippewa's with the signing of this treaty.

  • 1836: In this year the United States used fraud to illegally take a large part of the 5 million acre Chippewa Reservation in Iowa, extreme southern Minnesota, and northwestern Missouri. The Platte Purchase was fraudulent and led to a short minor war (Heatherly War) in 1836. Mormons commenced to increase their missionary work among the Chippewa's of this location. It led to civil strife.

  • 1838-1839: Swan Creek and Black River Saginaw Chippewa's followed prophecy and commenced an exodus west into Iowa, Missouri, and Kansas. They eventually settled in Kansas. Most continued to follow prophecy and migrated down to northern Mexico. The State of Coahuila, where a very large Reservation was set aside for them. Chief Eshtonoquot was one of the principle Chippewa leaders during the 1838-1839 exodus.
  • 1843 Fifty families from other bands wintered at Red Lake in 1842-43, and were fed from the surplus supplies . The Red Lake band were known to be thrifty farmers.

  • 1846: On June 5 and 17 of 1846, the United States broke treaty and illegally eradicated the 5 million acre Chippewa Reservation in Iowa, extreme southern Minnesota, and northwestern Missouri. After the Reservation was eradicated, large numbers of Chippewa's followed prophecy and migrated west and to Mexico. Among them was probably chief Big Bear and the parents of chief Rocky Boy. Actually, Chief Big Bear may have been chief Rocky Boy's father. Chief Little Bear (he was one of chief Big Bears sons) told the whites his father lived along the Snake River in southeastern Idaho. They moved up to the Black Hills of southwestern Montana. Chief Rocky Boy was born in either 1852 or 1853, near what would become Anaconda, Montana. After the eradication of the Chippewa's Iowa and Missouri Reservation, some of the Chippewa's relocated to eastern Kansas. The United States no longer referred to the Chippewa's of the old Chippewa Reservation in Iowa and Missouri, as Chippewa. They commenced to call them Potawatomi. Later, they included the Citizen Chippewa's as Citizen Potawatomi likewise. The Prairie Potawatomi Reservation of Kansas is really a Chippewa Reservation. They are the same people. The only part of the 5 million acre Reservation remaining now, is the Sac & Fox and Ioway Reservation of Nebraska. It borders the old 5 million acre Chippewa Reservation. Of course, the Sac and Ioway are Chippewa.

  • 1846-1847: Another large exodus commenced in 1846-1847. Over 70,000 Chippewa's, other Indians, and blacks migrated west into Utah, from the old Chippewa Reservation in Iowa, extreme southern Minnesota, and northwestern Missouri. Many were also from Kansas. Many blacks came up from the southeast and joined them on the westward exodus. Some of the Indians and blacks, built ships and sailed for Hawaii and other islands in the Pacific. A few Mormon Missionaries were amongst them. From Utah, they sent out exploration parties to find land the whites would vomit over. They found it in the deserts of Arizona, California, and Nevada. Not all moved to those locations however. Many moved to the region just east of Los Angeles, California. They settled the region between Los Angeles and San Bernardino. Today, they are very numerous in that location.In response to the massive exodus, the United States launched a war for control of Mexico which includes California of course.

  • 1847: Ceded more land in Michigan and Wisconsin.

  • 1849: A battle between the "Red Lake and Pillager Ojibwa and the Sioux was reported by J. E. Fletcher, the Winnebago Agent. The battles were in the Cass Lake, Leech Lane and Winnibigoshish Lake areas.

  • 1850: On September 7, 1850, the Saulteaux Chippewa's signed the Robinson Superior Treaty which created a large Saulteaux Chippewa Reserve north of Lake Superior where Pigeon River is located near Grand Portage Reservation, to Batchawana Bay in Ontario.

  • 1850: On September 9, 1850, the Robinson Huron Treaty created a large Saulteaux Chippewa Reserve between Batchawana Bay to Sault Ste. Marie to Penetanguishene.

  • 1854: On September 30, 1854, a treaty ceded much Chippewa land in Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. Several Reservations were created.

  • 1854: On October 13, 1854, the Saulteaux Chippewa's either ceded or refused to cede the Saugeen Peninsula. This is the second Robinson Huron Treaty. Supposedly the Saulteaux Chippewa's ceded the Saugeen Peninsula and were left with 5 small Reserves.

  • 1855: On February 22, 1855, a treaty was signed which ceded Chippewa land in Minnesota and created large Chippewa Reservations in Minnesota.

  • 1855: On May 14 and July 31, 1855, a treaty was signed which created Chippewa Reservations in Michigan. In the Lower Peninsula of Michigan, at least 9 (3 were connected) new Chippewa Reservations were created.

  • 1855: On October 17, 1855, the Little Shell Chippewa Blackfeet Reservation was created. It is also known as the Judith basin Indian reservation. Other tribes included are the Blackfeet Chippewa's, Flathead including the Kalispel,Pend d'Orellie, and Spokane all of whom are a mixture of Chippewa and Salish, and the Nez Perce.

  • 1859: On July 16, 1859, the Swan Creek and Black River Chippewa's, allowed the Munsee to live with them in Kansas.

  • 1859: On September 17, 1859,the Bad River Chippewa's of Wisconsin were created a Reservation on Madeline Island.

  • 1860-1908: Removed to Indian territory (Oklahoma) with the Munsee to live among the Cherokee.

  • 1860-1885: Fought a series of wars against the white invaders in Montana, North Dakota, Minnesota, Wyoming, Idaho, Washington, Oregon, California, Arizona, Utah, Nevada, New Mexico, Colorado, Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, Alberta, and Saskatchewan.

  • 1863: On October 2, 1863, the infamous Old Crossing Treaty was signed. Chief's Little Shell III, Red Thunder, and other Chippewa leaders refused to sign this treaty. It ceded Chippewa land in Minnesota and North Dakota. The Chippewa's retained all unceded land.

  • 1864: On May 7, 1864, a new treaty created a much larger Leech Lake Reservation for the Pillager Chippewa's of northern Minnesota. However, 5 Chippewa Reservations to the south were eradicated.

  • 1864-1865: Another large exodus was commenced by the Chippewa's of Kansas during late 1864 and early 1865. Chief Eshtonoquot organized the large exodus. The United States learned about the large number of Indians and blacks migrating to Mexico and sent a force of several hundred of their soldiers to try and halt the exodus. A battle (the Battle of Dove Creek) was fought on January 8, 1865 in northwestern Texas in which the Indians defeated the United States. The exodus continued. They eventually settled down in the Mexican States of Chihuahua and Coahuila. Mexican leaders formed an alliance with the Indians and blacks. They created several very large Reservations for the Indians and blacks in the Mexican States of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Sinaloa, and Sonora.

  • 1865 The American Fur Company established a Trading Post at Red Lake.

  • 1866: On April 7, 1866, a treaty ceded Bois Forte Chippewa land in northern Minnesota and created a large Bois Forte (Nett Lake) Chippewa Reservation.

  • 1867: On March 19, 1867, a treaty created the large White Earth Reservation. It is located in northwestern Minnesota. White Earth Reservation was really added on to Leech Lake Reservation. The March 19, 1867 Treaty, supposedly reduced the size of Leech Lake Reservation. However, as mentioned, Leech Lake Reservation was enlarged with the land addition of White Earth Reservation.

  • 1868: On June 1, 1868, a treaty was signed with Chippewa leaders of Kansas. Chief Eshtonoquot had recently died. After his death, new Chippewa leaders were more willing to relocate. They agreed to relocate to a new Reservation (the Navajo Reservation) in Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah. Another treaty was supposedly signed also on June 1, 1868, at Fort Sumner, New Mexico Territory which set aside the Navajo Reservation. However, the United States did not ratify (they don't recognize the Navajo Reservation) the June 1, 1868 Treaty signed at Fort Sumner, New Mexico Territory. That's why the June 1, 1868 Treaty signed by Chippewa leaders in Kansas, is an important backup.
  • 1871: On August 3, 1871, the Saulteaux Chippewa's of Manitoba ceded land in southern Manitoba and were created a large Reserve in Manitoba. Later, land was ceded. This treaty is known as Treaty 1.
  • 1871: On August 21, 1871, the Saulteaux Chippewa's of southwestern Manitoba and southeastern Saskatchewan, had a large Reserve created. Later, land was ceded. This treaty is known as Treaty 2.
  • 1873: On March 3, 1873, a treaty created the Pembina Chippewa Reservation of Minnesota. It is supposedly within the boundaries of White Earth Reservation.

  • 1873: On August 16, 1873, the Little Shell Chippewa's Judith basin Indian reservation was created. It was located within the boundaries of the original Blackfeet Reservation which was created on October 17, 1855. Supposedly the River Crow were created this Reservation but the Little Shell Chippewa's have long lived in that part of Montana. The Crow supposedly refused to move to the Reservation. The River Crow are really the Little Shell Chippewa's. The October 17, 1855 Blackfeet Treaty which was signed near the mouth of the Judith River in Montana, does not mention the River Crow nor the Dakotas including the Brule, Hunkpapa, Santee, Sisseton, Wahpeton, and Yanktonai. It does mention the Assiniboine who are Nakota or Nakoda. However, they are not Dakota. They are the enemies of the Dakotas. The Judith River is within the boundaries of the Judith basin Indian reservation.

  • 1873: On October 3, 1873, the Saulteaux Chippewa's of northwestern Ontario and eastern Manitoba, had a large Reserve created. Later, land was ceded. This treaty is known as Treaty 3.

  • 1874: On September 15, 1874, the Saulteaux Chippewa's had a large Reserve created in southwestern Manitoba, southern Saskatchewan, and southeastern Alberta. Later,land was ceded. This is Treaty 4.

  • 1875: On April 13, 1875, the United States added land to the Blackfeet Reservation of Montana which was created on October 17, 1855. The new land additions were located adjacent to and south of what is now the Fort Peck Reservation. It clearly States in the treaty that the land additions were for the Blackfoot, Blood, Gros Ventre, Piegan, and River Crow who are really the Little Shell Chippewa's.

  • 1875: On September 20, 1875, the Saulteaux Chippewa's of Manitoba were created a large Reserve in Manitoba. In all, there were 18 adhesion signings to Treaty 5. This is Treaty 5.

  • 1876: On August 23, 1876, a large Reserve was created for the Saulteaux Chippewa's of Alberta and Saskatchewan. Later, land was ceded. This is Treaty 6.

  • 1877: On September 22, 1877, a large Reserve was created for the Saulteaux Chippewa's of southern Alberta. Later, land was ceded. This is Treaty 7.

  • 1882: On December 21, 1882, the Turtle Mountain Reservation of North Dakota was created. Chief Little Shell III refused to take part in the treaty.

  • 1889: On July 8, 1889, the United States refused to honor treaty and allowed Chippewa men in Minnesota of voting age, to vote if they wanted to accept land allotments and have Reservation surplus land sold to the whites. They voted to accept land allotments and have surplus Reservation land sold to whites. The treaty is invalid. The United States did not deal with the Chippewa's on a nation to nation level. Chief's Little Shell III, Red Thunder, and other Chippewa leaders refused to accept this treaty.

  • 1890's The Chippewa tribe united with the Cree tribe.

  • 1892: McCumber Commission created a roll of 1,300 rejecting many equally eligible for the Turtle Mountain Chippewa. .

  • 1892: Chiefs Little Shell III and Red Thunder, refused to sign the illegal McCumber Agreement which was about 11 million acres along the Red River Valley of North Dakota and Minnesota, and the vast Turtle Mountain Reservation in the northern plains which was set aside in 1882.

  • 1898: A short Rebellion was fought in northern Minnesota. Chief Bugonaygishig led Chippewa soldiers during the short war to restore Chippewa Reservations in Minnesota. Through treaty agreements, the United States returned the Reservations.

  • 1899: On June 21, 1899, a large Reserve was created for the Saulteau Chippewa's of British Columbia, northern Alberta, northwestern Saskatchewan, and the southeastern part of what is now the Northwest Territories. All Treaty 8 land in British Columbia, a small part of northeastern Alberta, and all of Treaty 8 land in the southeastern part of the Northwest Territories, remains a Saulteaux Chippewa Reserve. This is Treaty 8.

  • 1904: Davis Roll for Turtle Mountain Chippewas contained 2,094 names and and admitted that there there were many others just as eligible. (Those migrating back and forth to Canada made it difficult.)

  • 1905: On June 29, 1905, a large Saulteaux Chippewa Reserve was created in northeastern Ontario. It borders the July 5, 1929 Saulteaux Chippewa Reserve located in northwestern Ontario. In all, there were 17 adhesion signings to Treaty 9.    

  • This is Treaty 9.
  • 1906: On August 19, 1906, a large Saulteaux Chippewa Reserve was created in northern Saskatchewan. In all, there were 4 signings to Treaty 10. This is Treaty 10.

  • 1910-1920: In northern Mexico, the large Reservations created for the Chippewa's, other Indians, and blacks were eradicated by Mexico. It led to the 1910-1920 Mexican Civil War. Indian and black soldiers fought their way south into southern Mexico. The settled between the Mexican States of Nayarit and Oaxaca. Many of the blacks settled in the region where Costa Chica is located.

  • 1916: Assigned to Rocky Boy's Reservation in Montana with the Plains Cree.

  • 1921: On June 27, 1921, a large Saulteau Chippewa Reserve was created in the Northwest Territories. In all, there were 9 signings to Treaty 11. This is Treaty 11.

  • 1929: On July 5, 1929, a large Reserve was created for the Saulteaux Chippewa's of northwestern Ontario. In all, there were 17 adhesion signings to Treaty 9. This is a part of Treaty 9.

  • 1968: The American Indian Movement (AIM) founded by three Ojibwa: Dennis Banks, George Mitchell, and Clyde Bellecourt.

Reservations

From the mid-1800's, the official policy of the United States government toward the American Indian was to confine each tribe to a specific parcel of land called a reservation. Agencies were established on or near each reservation. A government representative, usually called an agent (or superintendent) was assigned to each agency. Their duties included maintaining the peace, making payments to the Native Americans based on the stipulations of the treaties with each tribe, and providing a means of communication between the native population and the federal government.

Sometimes, a single agency had jurisdiction over more than one reservation. And sometimes, if the tribal population and land area required it, an agency may have included sub-agencies.

The boundaries of reservations, over time, have changed. Usually, that means the reservations have been reduced in size. Sometimes, especially during the later policy of "termination," the official status of reservations was ended altogether

The following list of reservations has been compiled from the National Atlas of the United States of America[4], the Omni Gazetteer of the United States of America, and other sources.




Bruce, H. E. The Turtle Mountain Reservation in North Dakota. Belcourt, ND. Turtle Mountain Consolidated Agency, 1948.

Bands and Other SubdivisionsUnited States

Many of the bands or groups of Chippewa in the United States reside in Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. The band names have changed or have been spelled differently over time. Many of the groups listed below have their own reservation. Some are federally recognized and have an agency of the Bureau of Indian Affairs with whom they interact. Multiple groups sometimes interact with a single BIA Agency. More information will be forthcoming on pages for each of the bands or groups listed below.

Some of the larger bands of Chippewa in the United States are: Canada

The Ojibway First Nations in Canada, live in Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, British Columbia, Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut..





Allotment Records

Ransom Judd Powell, 1865-1937 His Papers in the Minnesota Historical Society's Division of Library and Archives. His involvement with the Ojibwe (Chippewa) Indians of the White Earth (Minnesota) Reservation) as a member of government commission established by Congress in 1913 to compile a roll and land allotments within the White Earth Reservation and determine the blood status of each allottee s. FHL films 1550598- 1550612

Harold Hickerson. Land Tenure of the Rainy Lake Chippewa. FHL film: 965791 item 5

Correspondence and Census[[PASTING TABLES IS NOT SUPPORTED]]

1836 census - 6th article of 1836 Treaty of of men, women and children FHL Film: 982330 Item 4 or FHL Book: Q 970.1 Al #4

National Archives film M2039, Correspondence, Field Notes, and Census Roll of all members or descendents of members who were on the roll of the Ottawa and the Chippewa tribes of Michigan in 1870, and living on March 4, 1907 (Durant Roll).

  • The 1907 census, the so-called Durant Roll entries are arranged alphabetically by first letter of the surname and grouped by tribal bands. The census includes the 1870 census roll number (This number indexes Durant's filed notes and consists of two numbers separated by a hypen. The firs number is assigned to a specific family; the second number is the page number on the field notes. (source: NARA RR#1002)

National Archives film M234, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, 1824-1881. Includes 1. 1838 list of Chippewa, Ottawa and Pottawatomie entitled to benefits at the Council Bluffs Agency. (File H571, Roll 215) 2. 1878 lists of heads of families for Pillager and Lake Winnebigoshish Chippewa, (Fild K259, Roll 1166) 3. 1878 lists of heads of families for White Oake, Point and Mississippi Chippewa, (File K266, Roll 166)(source: NAR RR#1002)


Church Records

Fruth, Alban Reverend. A Century of Missionary Work Among the Red Lake Chippewa Indians, 1858-1958. Red Lake, MN:St. Mary's Mission, C 1958. FHL Digital


Treaties
  • 1785 January 21, at Fort McIntosh - Wyandot

  • 1789 January 9, at Fort Harmar - Wyandot

  • 1795 August 3, at Greenville - Wyandot

  • 1805 July 4, at Fort Industry - Wyandot

  • November 17, 1807, at Detroit - Ottawa

  • 1808 November 25, at Brownstown

  • 1815 September 8, at Spring Wells - Wyandot

  • 1816 August 24, at St. Louis - Ottawa

  • 1817 September 29, on the Miami - Wyandot

  • 1818 Wyandot

  • 1819 September 24, at Saginaw

  • 1820 June 16, at Sault Ste. Marie

  • 1820 July 6, L'Arbe Croche and Michilmackinac

  • 1821 August 29, at Chicago - Ottawa

  • 1825 with the Sioux

  • 1826August 19, at Fond du Lac

  • 1827 August 11, at Butte des Morts

  • 1828 August25, at Green Bay - Winnebago

  • 1829 July 29, at Prairie du Chien

  • September 26, 1833, at Chicago

  • March 28, 1836, - Ottawa

  • 1836 May 9, at Washington

  • 1837 January 14, at Detroit

  • 1837 July 29, at St. Peter

  • 1837 December, at Flint River

  • 1838 January 23, at Saginaw

  • 1839 February 7,

  • 1842 October 4, at La Pointe
  • June 5 and 17, 1846, at Council Bluffs

  • 1846 Potawatomi Nation

  • August 2, 1847, at Fond du Lac

  • 1847 August 2, Chippewa of the Mississippi and Lake Superior
  • August 2, 1847, Pillager Band of Chippewa

  • August 21, 1847, at Leech Lake

  • 1854 September 30, at La Pointe

  • 1855 February 22, at Washington

  • 1855 August 2,of Saginaw

  • July 31, 1855, at Detroit -

  • August 2, 1855, at Detroit -Chippewa of Sault Ste., Marie

  • 1859 July 16, at Sauk and Foxes Agency

  • March 11, 1863, at Washington

  • March 11, 1863, Chippewa of the Mississippi and the Pilager and Lake Winnibigoshish Bands,

  • 1863 October 2, at Red Lake and Pembina Bands

  • 1864 April 12, at Washington, Red Lake and Pembina Bands

  • 1864 May 7,at Washington

  • October 18, 1864, at Isabella Reserve
  • 1864 October 18, Chippewa of Saginaw, Swan Creek and Black River

  • 1866 April 7, at Washington, Bois Forte Band

  • 1867 March 19, at Washington, Chippewa of the Mississippi
Black River Treaty
  • May 9, 1836

  • 1855 August 2,
  • October 18, 1864
Vital Records
  • Consolidated Chippewa Agency, M595, births and deaths, 1924-1932, FHL Film: 574229
  • Lad du Flambeau Agency, M595, births and deaths,1924-1932,FHL Film: 576920
  • Red Lake Agency, M595,births and deaths, 1925-1932, FHL Film: 581416
  • Turtle Mountain Agency, M595,births and deaths,1924-1932, FHL Film: 583063
Websites

Records

The majority of records of individuals were those created by the agencies. Some records may be available to tribal members through the tribal headquarters.They were (and are) the local office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and were charged with maintaining records of the activities of those under their responsibility. Among these records are:



EXTERNAL LINKS THAT WILL DIRECT YOU TO  A DIFFERENT WEBSITE

Agencies





  • Basic facts about the Chippewa, primarily written for students.
  • More detailed history of the Ojibwa or Chippewa, by Hodge
For Further Reading

For background information to help find American Indian ancestors see For Further Reading.

References
  1.  Facts for Kids: Ojibway Indians (Chippewa, Ojibway) 
  2.  *Hodge, Frederick Webb. Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution, 1906
  3.  Facts for Kids: Ojibway Indians (Chippewa, Ojibway) Available online.
  4.  National Atlas of the United States of America -- Federal Lands and Indian Reservations
  5. Isaacs. Katherine M., editor. Omni Gazetteer of the United States of America. U.S. Data Sourcebook, Volume 11 Appendices, Bureau of Indian Affairs List of American Indian Reservations, Appendix E, Indian Reservations. Omnigraphics, Inc., 1991 (Family History Library book 973 E5)
  6.  Facts for Kids: Ojibway Indians (Chippewa, Ojibway) 
  7. Facts for Kids: Ojibway Indians (Chippewa, Ojibway) 

  8. Hill, Edward E. The Office of Indian Affairs, 1824-1880: Historical Sketches, Clearwater Publishing Co., Inc. 1974. (Family History Library book 970.1 H551o.)
  9. Jump up↑ Hill, Edward E. (comp.). Guide to Records in the National Archives of the United States Relating to American Indians. Washington DC: National Archives and Records Service, General Services Administration, 1981. (FHL book 970.1 H551g.)